“What We Should Say When We Pray,” by Andrew J. Schatkin

“What We Should Say When We Pray,” by Andrew J. Schatkin

Many of us when we pray, if we pray at all, or in fact seek and wish to be in any sort of relationship with God, most of the time, if any of us are fairly honest with ourselves, know that when we have any sort of relationship, it is mostly about ourselves and the other person who we think we are in a relationship with; in reality we are in a relationship with ourselves and the other person is some sort of object who we give little thought of other than that person being a mechanism for our own self-love and self-gain ego and self-importance. In fact, I think it is true that whatever and whoever we are in a relationship with, it is about ourselves and gaining and attaining our own form of satisfaction from that other person. Prayer, I think as properly understood, of God and man, is that God is a being of great love for he created and redeemed humanity. His love is so overwhelming that he gave his only begotten son as the ultimate sacrifice who endured not only the death of the cross for all men and women but endured great suffering leading to his tortured death. When we pray, it is a mutual exchange of love and this love is at least for god and Christ unconditional and our prayer is coming to know and becoming one with the love of Christ. Prayer is not seeking gain from god and getting what we want, but an exchange of love between creature and creator, where that love of god and Christ will transform us by that love from a being who asks and wants, to a being in the image of god and Christ, where love is exchanged forever and ever in the joy of heaven in the presence of all the angels and the company of heaven. This is true prayer, where the love of god and Christ becomes one with us as we pray and come to touch god and Christ in our prayers with our love.