“The Meaning, Understanding, and Possible Interpretation of the Parable of the Lost Drachma,” by Andrew J. Schatkin

“The Meaning, Understanding, and Possible Interpretation of the Parable of the Lost Drachma,” by Andrew J. Schatkin

My dear readers, thinkers, and friends, I offer here an interpretation, analysis, and possible understanding of the Parable of the Lost Drachma, found in the gospel of Luke chapter 15 verses 8-10.

This parable is one of the finest examples of the message that Jesus seeks out and loves sinners who repent. In this parable, Jesus says that what woman having ten silver coins, if she loses one coin, does not light a lamp and sweep the house and seek diligently until she finds it; and, when she has found it, she calls together her friends and neighbors saying: “Rejoice with me for I have found the coin which I had lost.” Jesus ends this parable saying, in the same way, there is joy before the angels of god over one sinner who repents.

In this parable, the woman who lost one silver coin out of ten was probably very poor and, losing one coin, she looks all over her house for it until she finds it and is so happy that she invites her friends and neighbors where she entertains them. The point of the parable is clear: at the last judgment, there will be more joy over one sinner who has repented or who had been lost to god. In a sense, Jesus is telling us here that the value that he places on every single human being is very great, regardless and in spite of his failings the depth of his sins and his degradation in his life. The value is so without measure that if the person was morally lost in his present life, on whatever basis he may have failed, nevertheless there will be great joy if he repents and therefore rescued. The joy is so great that god himself surrounded by his angels will together share the great joy that one person formerly lost has been found.

This essay is taken, with alterations modifications, from my book entitled, “The Parables of Jesus: A Personal Commentary,” pub. by Hamilton books 2018 p. 89.